Chiapas Mexico and Bonampak

Usumacinta River

Usumacinta River

Take a super wild bus ride together with the local Lacandon Mayan and you can possibly try to arrange to see the significant relics. There are also Monolithic limestone and and special place with story-telling murals. They may remind you of the violent past of the Maya, but historical, this place is worth a look if you are not afraid of the agonizing images portrayed by the paintings. Massive and towering trees are all in the surrounding areas. Tall stele and pillars abound. High pyramids too.

Usumacinta River

The Usumacinta River is located in the northern part of Guatemala. At the junction of the Pasion River, you can see the Sierra de Santa Cruz and Salinas River (Chixoy or Negro). The total is one thousand kilometers altogether and it is the only visible natural boundary separating Mexico from the Yucatan Peninsula. Yaxchilan is also the City Lorillard. It is also known as Menche and is an ancient Maya city. You can find it on the bank of the Usumacinta River. The next is a Maya site called the Piedras Negras. On the north bank of the same river, this name simply means ‘black stones’. This used to be an independent city-state during the Classic Period. Palenque was also a Maya city state about 130 kilometers south of Ciudad del Carmen. This is a medium sized site, where you can see the Pacal the Great who was responsible for the city’s architecture and art.

Temple of Murals in Bonampak

There is a long narrow building and separated into three chambers, some say it is three rooms. It has a low-stepped pyramid base and you can see all around the classic Maya painting which dated from 790. These paintings were made as the frescos and there were great realism shown in the three chambers. The story it tells was about a series of actual events, for example, you can see the robing of priests and nobles. There was a ceremony about the child appointed as a noble heir. Youc an also observe the wooden trumpets orchestra.

Edificio de Las Pinturas

Chiapas, Bonampak

Chiapas, Bonampak

In the second chamber, you can see the war scenes. Prisoners with ritually bleeding fingers, the Chaan Muwaan II, and scenes of human sacrifice. In the third chamber, is another ceremony. This time, with dancers in fine costumes. They also wear masks of gods. The ritual of bloodletting with stick needles into their tongues are all recorded on the paintings. There are also hieroglyphic text that indicated the names and dates of the events.

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